Familiar Concepts, New Contexts

This week, Marcy returns to Tagalog mythology to showcase the daughters of a very familiar figure. Maybe too familiar, but don't worry about for now.


Sources:
1. Jocano, F. "Notes on Philippine Divinities," Philippine Folk Literature: The Myth, Daminan Eugenio, UP Press, 2001. https://www.asj.upd.edu.ph/mediabox/archive/ASJ-06-02-1968/jocano-notes-philippine-divinities.pdf
2. “Bathala's Daughters: The Demigods Mayari, Hanan & Tala.” THE ASWANG PROJECT, 14 May 2018, www.aswangproject.com/bathalas-daughters-demigods-mayari-hanan-tala/.

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Transcript available on our website: www.miscellanymedia.online/transcripts
Music for this Episode by Sounds Like an Earful: Soundslikeanearful.com
Twitter: @MiscellanyMedia
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Support the project: www.ko-fi.com/mmstudios

Jeepneys - The Places They've Been

Maybe this isn't the best topic for a podcast episode, but Marcy loves Jeepneys. So you think she would have known more about the subject before doing this episode? Nope. It's not something you might be inclined to think about.


Sources:
1. Otsuka, Keijiro, et al. “Community and Market in Contract Choice: The Jeepney in the Philippines.” Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 34, no. 2, 1986, pp. 279–298., doi:10.1086/451528.
2. Syed, Saira. “End of the Road for Jeepneys in the Philippines?” BBC News, BBC, 30 July 2013, www.bbc.com/news/business-23352851.

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Transcript available on our website: www.miscellanymedia.online/transcripts
Music for this Episode by Sounds Like an Earful: Soundslikeanearful.com
Twitter: @MiscellanyMedia
Tumblr: miscellanymedia
Support the project: www.ko-fi.com/mmstudios

The Danger of Noli Me Tangere

Today, Marcy bring up what she sees as one of the main (and most dangerous when the book was released) themes of this culture defining novel.

Not so much Good vs Evil but Real vs Appearance.
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Music for this Episode by Sounds Like an Earful
Soundslikeanearful.com

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www.miscellanymedia.online
Twitter: @MiscellanyMedia
Tumblr: miscellanymedia
Transcript available: www.miscellanymedia.online/transcripts
Support the project: www.ko-fi.com/mmstudios

Reflections on Maria Clara

There's one character of Noli Me Tangere that stood out to Marcy, so she wantes to take the time to talk about that today.

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Transcript available on our website: www.miscellanymedia.online/transcripts
Music for this Episode by Sounds Like an Earful: Soundslikeanearful.com
Twitter: @MiscellanyMedia
Tumblr: miscellanymedia
Support the project: www.ko-fi.com/mmstudios


And check out The Oracle of Dusk wherever you are listening to this podcast

Noli Me Tangere - Frames

Let's get to know the book before we dive into it, shall we? Because... oh my word, there's a lot to unpack.


Sources:
1. Rizal, Jose. Noli Me Tangere. Harold Augenbraum (trans). Penguin: New York, 2006.

----
Transcript available on our website: www.miscellanymedia.online/transcripts
Music for this Episode by Sounds Like an Earful: Soundslikeanearful.com
Twitter: @MiscellanyMedia
Tumblr: miscellanymedia
Support the project: www.ko-fi.com/mmstudios


And check out The Oracle of Dusk wherever you are listening to this podcast

Jose Rizal - A Beginning in His Own Way

Welcome to Season 2. Marcy starts it off by looking at a pretty important (and very familiar) historical figure, Jose Rizal and seeks to explain one reason why--in her mind--he was so important.


Sources:
1. Francia, Luis H. “José Rizal: A Man for All Generations.” The Antioch Review, vol. 72, no. 1, 2014, p. 44., doi:10.7723/antiochreview.72.1.0044.
2. Jose Rizal's entry on the Encyclopedia Brittanica.
3. Jackson, Michael. The Politics of Storytelling: Violence, Transgression, and Intersubjectivity. Museum Tusculanum Press, 2006.
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Transcript available on our website: www.miscellanymedia.online/transcripts
Music for this Episode by Sounds Like an Earful: Soundslikeanearful.com
Twitter: @MiscellanyMedia
Tumblr: miscellanymedia
Support the project: www.ko-fi.com/mmstudios